Lev's Hacking Notes

Dropping Pakets and F# Bombs

2021-03-25 Tags: F#

I tried to be clever with the title.

I spent the better part of the evening yesterday trying to get the LaunchDarkly .NET SDK to work in F#. This was a part of my current journey of trying to learn more F# so that I can continue to contribute to the dark porting effort.

My first problem was I was trying to use the Paket package manager which is in use in dark, but for some reason I could not get any of the installed dependencies to be recognized. I randomly got it working in one project when I saved and re-opened a file, but then when I started a new project the same trick didn't work.

Needless to say I have no idea what I am doing. After spending way too much time troubleshooting this, I just switched back to the built in package manager from the dotnet CLI which uses nuget. This got me to the point where I was able to at least load and recognize the dependency in my F# code.

Sadly, I was not able to get this to actually work. I think the main problems is that I don't really understand how to use .NET objects from within F# and all of my code, while syntactically correct, looks like object oriented F# (which I guess is kind of a thing, but not really).

The good news is that I am sure I will figure this out given enough time, so onwards for now.

Articles from blogs I follow around the net

Working Code Podcast - Episode 026: Passwords

Ben Nadel and the crew talk about passwords, why they need to be stored securely, and how to properly use one-way hashing algorithms like BCrypt in order to evolve password security alongside increasingly-strong compute resources....

via Ben Nadel's Web Development and User Experience Feed @ BenNadel.com June 9, 2021

I will be moving to the Netherlands

I had been planning a move to the Netherlands for a while, at least until a large COVID-shaped wrench was thrown into the gears. However, I was fully vaccinated by early April, and there are signs of the border opening up now, so my plans have been slowly ge…

via Drew DeVault's blog June 7, 2021

Git: An Interactive Development History

In April I set out to create an interactive visualization of the Git distributed version control system, and I’ve finally reached a point where it’s ready for others to see. Here’s a screenshot of the current version: This became one of my larger projects,…

via jpalmer.dev May 18, 2021

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